Jul 13, 2017

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 869: Gremlin Trouble #20, 1999

https://www.comics.org/issue/134169/

Coming to the end of my run of Gremlin Trouble, just as things appear to be heating up for a final confrontation between the forces of light and the forces of darkness. I assume it's the final confrontation, anyway, as there are only ten issues left in the series. I have no idea if the story was finished in a satisfactory manner, or if it suffered the fate of many indie comics and simply could not continue. In the event that I'm unlikely to find the rest of the series, I'm going to assume it ends in a nice, neat way.

One problem I'm having with the series, a problem that is directly a result of only reading issues in the last portion of the series, is keeping all the different factions straight. There's Gremlins, Goblins, Pixies, Tuberians, Nimrods, Humans, Fairies...I think that's it. And I'm not sure who is allied with whom. I think it's a case of all of them being slightly at odds with each other, but having the common enemy of the "Dark Forces" that, one imagines, will bind everyone together. That's usually how these things go.

I'm not sure I've mentioned it, but there's a wonderful humorousness to the comic that is always prevalent, even in dire situations. Today's comic has two great examples, both in the character of Pentangle. The first instance is an entry in her diary, which outlines the very serious mission that the group is undertaking, and then goes on to note the amazing shampoo she tried the day before, which left her hair looking "even more silky and gorgeous than before." The second instance, also hair-related, is during a duel that Pentangle is sure she's going to lose until her opponent accidentally slices off a lock of hair, at which point the Gremlin princess loses her shit and goes full berserker. It's a tough line to walk, keeping the humour level up even in serious situations. Many stories will have humorous moments and serious moments, and the two are kept separate for dramatic effect. But the "action-comedy" genre in which Gremlin Trouble exists leaves the possibility (and, indeed, probability) of humour in all situations. It sets a nice tone for the book.

Last issue I have tomorrow. To be continued.

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