Sep 20, 2018

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 1303: Tales Too Terrible to Tell #8, May-June 1993

https://www.comics.org/issue/97729/

A cool reprint title that I've had kicking about since I had my store, though it's apparently quite a bit older than that.

The reprints are all black and white, drawn from original art, and all from pre-Code horror titles. Editor George Suarez has an encyclopedic knowledge and collection of this era of comics, and he's only too happy to share with the readers.

It's kind of a nice irony that the short essay in the comic covering one of the big horror comic publishers of the time was on Harvey Comics. I've just finished reading a collection of their horror comics, so it was cool to get a little bit of background. What the comic also does is make me want to track down more reprints. And it'll have to be reprints as far as these comics go, I think. There's no way I can afford originals.

Well....maybe just one...

More to come...

Sep 19, 2018

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 1302: Wendy - Witchworld #49, June 1973

https://www.comics.org/issue/265259/

I actually read a Richie Rich comic for today, and then realized that I'd read it way back in the second year of the project. Which is fine - I'm happy to keep exploring the Harvey-verse.

Having just finished a Harvey Horrors collection (watch for an upcoming review), I find myself wondering if some of the same strange people working for Harvey were responsible for the less-horrific fare as well. These stories are definitely aimed at children, but there's something just a little off about them.This comic is a perfect example. Wendy's story is actually the most "normal," in that it's about her trying to go to school. But then Casper visits a land where everyone is different kinds of glass, and then Spooky paints his had with solid gold.

I want to say that there is a naive sort of magical realism going on in the stories, and in this sort of shared universe. I may have to call it the big-headverse, as Wendy shares the same very odd character design as Richie and Casper. I'll have to see if that trend continues in the other titles.

More to come...

The 40 Years of Comics Project - The Bi-Weekly Graphic Novel Number 76 - Lolita v.2, 1994

Continuing, after the break, with the erotic adventures of Belore's Lolita.

Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Paper Dolls, by Trina Robbins


You know the drill!

Apply nuns to cardboard, then carefully cut out habits.

Sep 18, 2018

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 1301: Casper, The Friendly Ghost #207, December 1979

https://www.comics.org/issue/202365/

A wonderfully harmless little comic. Which, honestly, is all I've ever thought Harvey Comics were. But last weekend I picked up a reprint collection of some of their early 50s horror comics, and they're messed up. Wonderfully messed up. To me, Harvey has always been about Casper and Richie Rich titles, and little else. So to see that the company came from a fairly brutal place is very interesting.

Now, that said, there's always the old saw that goes around about Casper, in that he's the ghost of a child. Usually, that's a pretty terrifying prospect. In light of the Afterlife with Archie series, can it be long before we get a grim'n'gritty(tm) reboot?

I might actually read a bit more Casper tomorrow. There's certainly something to be said for a comic that amuses but does little else. Sometimes thinking is overrated.

More to come...

Sep 17, 2018

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 1300: Avenue X, December 1994

https://www.comics.org/issue/753017/

I can only assume that had I read the previous issue, published 2 years before this one, I'd have any idea whatsoever what was happening here. I've enjoyed Fauve's work in the Carnal Comics line, but here she seems somewhat unfocussed. That said, the middle insert, a colour 3-page intro of a Charlie's Angel's-style team, is pretty fantastic.

One cool feature of the comic is that it's bi-lingual. There is a translation page for the Spanish at the end of the comic, but not in the comic itself. It makes for a nice, off-putting feeling when you're only understanding part of what's being said. Considering the action takes place in a strange vampire club, that off-putting feeling is quite appropriate.

This comic is strange. Not only was it hard to read, but there's a bit at the end where the creators offer thanks to people, and Fauve's comes across as being embarrassed of her work with Carnal Comics. It's a pity that someone would feel bad about work that's actually pretty great.

There is one nice text feature, that reads thus:

"Men and women unite to create a more fun world! Stop the oppression of women throughout the world! Hemp users are not criminals! Gay Pride! Don't be a homophobe it's not fun! Shelter is not a privilege. Instigate and demand good housing for all! Life will be more fun!!"

A naive articulation, perhaps, but an essentially good one. And, give the publication date of 1994, quite forward thinking.

More to come...


Sep 16, 2018

The 40 Years of Comics Project - Day 1299: Snowbuni, January 1991

https://www.comics.org/issue/307619/

The title character in today's comic might well be the textbook definition of fan service. At least, a few times, the comic itself comments on Snowbuni's...ummm...unconventional?....attire.

I decided to give this comic a go because it's publisher, MU Press, is one of the ones that seems to have in some way carried on from the undergrounds. There's a few publications from MU listed in the Fogel guide to undergrounds, though Snowbuni is not.

It also seems that this is the end of a story that took place elsewhere. An editorial in the comic notes that the title character has been around in mini comics for quite some time, and it looks like this full-size comic finishes things off. So, as happens so many times, I have no clue what the heck was going on. That said, there were a couple of short, funny stories that were quite amusing, and didn't rely too much on a great back knowledge of the characters.

I gave a talk recently on queer comics just before the Pride march. One of the attendees asked why I hadn't mentioned furry comics in my talk, and I had to admit that my exposure to them is quite limited. But there's quite a lot of these anthropomorphic science fiction epic series out and about. Perhaps I'll have to find a good one to read.

More to come...